Observing                               

Welcome to Airdrie Observatory.
 

Did you know that there are only four public observatories in the United Kingdom? That they are ALL in Scotland? and that Airdrie Observatory is the smallest and the second oldest?

Airdrie Astronomical Association opens the observatory during astronomical events, at open days, for ten evening viewing sessions between November and January and by arrangement for groups wishing to visit. 
 Follow us on Facebook for all the latest astronomy news and Observatory updates.

AAA operates Airdrie Observatory on behalf of North Lanarkshire Council (NLC).

Meet our curators

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Did you know that Airdrie Observatory has had some very famous visitors including three Apollo astronauts, one of which is a Moonwalker!

Visit Walk With Destiny to learn more about these incredible visits, organised by club secretary, Aileen Malone.

 

Our joint curators William Tennant and Jack Frederick
will be on hand to answer all your questions and show you around the Observatory.

Winter Observing Sessions

Our Winter Observing Sessions are back after a two year break due to Covid restrictions. 

Join us in the Observatory, which is located in Airdrie Library, Wellwynd, use our historic telescope to observe the night sky and meet our curators who will answer your questions and make you feel very welcome.

Our open observing sessions will run on Tuesday evenings from 1st Nov 2022 till 13 Dec inclusive and 

10th Jan till 28th Feb 2023 inclusive from 5:30pm - 7pm (last admission 6:45pm)
 


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Our Winter Viewing Sessions Run on Tuesday nights during November, December and January.

Viewing nights are open to the public from 5:30 - 7:00pm (last admission 6:45pm)
So pop in and visit us!

 

Why not book a visit for your group?
Group visits include a presentation about the Solar System as well as a visit to the Observatory and are a great outing for all ages.

To Book a group visit contact us to reserve your night!

 


 

Observatory Calendar
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Use our handy Observatory Calendar below to see if there is a group booked in on the night you plan to visit. 
This way you will have an idea of how busy the Observatory might be on your trip.

Whats up at the Airdrie Observatory from now till Christmas.

Below is a list of celestial objects that will be hoping to see during this sessions viewing evenings, weather permitting.

 

1st November 2021

The 8 day old moon, Saturn and Jupiter.

We may also spot a few Taurid meteors as these will still be active tonight and for the next few weeks. We may be able to view the Andromeda galaxy.

The winter constellations will start to come into better viewing positions over the next  few months.

 

8th November 2021

The 15 day old moon, Saturn and Jupiter.

We may be able to view the Andromeda galaxy and Pleiades

The winter constellations will start to come into better viewing positions over the next weeks.

 

15th November 2021

Saturn and Jupiter are still present.

We may be able to view the Andromeda galaxy and Pleiades

The winter constellations will start to come into better viewing positions over the next weeks.

 

22nd November 2021

Saturn and Jupiter will still be good to see, although Saturn is getting lower on the horizon.

We may be able to view the Andromeda galaxy and Pleiades

The winter constellations will start to come into better viewing positions over the next weeks.

 

29th November 2021

Jupiter will be good to see and we may see the International space station pass close to Jupiter during the session.

 A six day old moon will be visible. We may be able to view the Andromeda galaxy and Pleiades

Mars is starting to become viewable and will be very prominent over the next month or two.

The winter constellations will start to come into better viewing positions over the next weeks.

 

6th December 2021

Jupiter will be getting near best position for this viewing season

 A thirteen day old moon will be visible and close to the Pleiades. We may be able to view the Pleiades. Mars is getting higher in the sky.

 

 

13th December 2021

 

This is the last open evening for the year and our first open evening in the New Year will be the 10th January 2023.

Jupiter will be getting near best position and will reach its highest point in the sky at 6.45pm

We may be able to view the Andromeda galaxy and Pleiades.

Mars is getting higher in the sky. Uranus is quite high in the sky, it is a very dim planet just viewable with the naked eye under dark skies but we may attempt to see it through the telescope.

“My husband and daughter visited the observatory on tuesday night and thoroughly enjoyed it.  Thank you all so much taking the time with them. My husband has always had an interest but it was great to see my daughter getting excited about it. She went into school the next day and did a small talk about the night.”

 

Anne S

 

Observing some Sun Spots! 
Our friendly Telescope team 

“Space is EPIC!”

 

Jude W. 

 

“Sun spots through the telescope onto paper……fantastic!”

 

Jacquie & Hope Corry

 

“Enjoyed the stories & seeing the telescope”

 

Steven Cole

The Chinese mid-Autumn Festival event

“This was terrific, a great big bravo from all of us. We will be back with another group soon. Thanks again.”

 

2nd Coatbridge Cub Scouts

Celebrating the Chinese Mid-Autumn
Festival in style.